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Stardust

Blog post by Randi Richardson On a moonlit night, under a star-studded sky, a melancholy, young man sat on the spooning wall situated on the south side of campus along Third Street.  It was late summer before the students returned to campus for the fall semester of 1927.  All was quiet as he pondered his

The Life and Times of Hattie (Dunihoo) Herold Parks

Blog post by Randi Richardson Harriett “Hattie” M. Dunihoo was one of the very few children from Monroe County to ever be placed at the state-supported Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Children’s Home in Knightstown, Indiana, about 40 miles west of Indianapolis.  The home was established in 1866 for the children of veterans and active members of the military.

A Nursing Spotlight: Edna Hardacre

Blog post by Hilary Fleck If the past twelve months have shown us anything, it is that the dedication of nurses to care for their patients is never ending. One such dedicated nurse was Enda (Ferguson) Hardacre, an enlisted Red Cross nurse serving with the U.S. Navy during World War 1. Edna was born in

Snuffing Out a Killer

The summer of 1952 wasn’t just another summer.  Swimming pools and movie theaters closed.  Children were kept inside their homes by frightened parents. No doubt about it, people were scared.  They had every right to be.  It was an epidemic year for polio.  According to one study, the only thing they feared more than polio in 1952 was

Beryl Hovious and Public Enemy No. 1

Blog post by Randi Richardson In 1924 John Dillinger, a petty criminal and resident of Mooresville, Indiana, was found guilty of a bungled robbery attempt and an assault on a local grocer.  Unable to afford a lawyer, the court threw the book at him.  He was sentenced from 10 to 21 years in prison.  Although John’s

Art in the Dome

Blog post by Randi Richardson Art in and around Bloomington is available in abundance; some of the oldest art, freely and readily accessed by the public, is that in the courthouse dome.  It is the work of Gustav Adolph Brand (1862-1944). County commissioners and a committee of Bloomington citizens composed of Henry Gentry, J. D. Showers, Fred

The Racial Integration of Bloomington in the 1940s

Blog post by Randi Richardson Several months ago I watched an Oscar-winning movie, Green Book, from the comfort of my home with ear phones and captions so I didn’t miss a word.  The move is based on the true story of two men, an Italian-American named Anthony Vallelonga aka Tony Lip, and an African American, Don Shirley, a gifted

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